Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Six Weeks On C&L Best Blooming List




I thought last week might be the last time I would be seeing Phlox pilosa the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox, but take a look at this shot from a trip into the wilderness back garden this morning!


and another shot in the same garden bed.


She is still lovely and still fragrant...this is the beginning of her sixth week!

If this is your first visit to this garden you probably haven't heard about this phenomenal long season bloomer. Phlox pilosa is practically perfect because she has beautiful flowers in a lovely shade of pink, requires little care, spreads demurely, has sweet fragrance and blooms for more than a month. Her color does get a bit more pink then fades to purple as she ages. If she travels a bit more than you like...just dig her out. Yesterday, I transplanted a few of her progeny into the sunny front garden and I expect they will adjust with very little complaint. I have none about her.

Do you have a favorite plant in your garden? One that you secretly like above all the rest?

Gail

16 comments:

  1. This is definitely a plant I would like very much. One of my criteria for plants is a long bloom time.

    Boy, do I secretly have a plant I like above all others? That is like asking if I have a child I like above all others. Honestly, it depends on the season. For me I would have to say any showy plant for a long time is my best plant. Camelia for winter, Clematis for spring, Brown eyes for summer, Eupatoriums (all of them) for fall. That is the best I can do!:)

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  2. Tina,

    This is a great comment and really I have no expectations that anyone really have a favorite! PPPP is a pleasing plant and of course there will be some for you.

    Gail

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  3. I think I'd have to say my Russian sage or maybe the salvia. But that could be because the salvia is blooming right now and the Russian sage is easy to propagate! Although I really like my Father's Day present that I got a little early this year! I'll post about it later...

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  4. Please don't tell the others (particularly the delphinium, they're such big crybabies) I said so, but this African Daisy is my current obsession...

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  5. Dave,
    You big tease...can't wait to see your Father's Day present. I like Salvias a lot these days...when a plant blooms for the entire summer it's hard not to like it.

    Gail

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  6. Stacy,


    I promise not to reveal any secrets to the Delphinium sisters, I understand completely about crybaby plants...Larkspur likes to pout.
    That is one spectacular flower and the color is outstanding, don't you think it is exotic?


    Gail

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  7. The stately and lovely delphinium. But then again, -- but so fussy and prone to tipsyness.

    Coneflowers, then. And daisies.

    But then like Dave said, Russian sage, lovely, scented and easy to propagate.

    Oh! I know, Mondarda, especially the flashy Raspberry Wine.

    And daffodils. But the tulips, too....

    And now I think I must see if PPPP will grow in Maine.

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  8. Henbogle,

    What a lovely list. PPPP may grow there...it will survive NY winters, I guess it depends upon the siting. another name for it is Phlox pilosa or Prairie Phlox.

    Gail

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  9. Hi Gail, You have finally worn me down, I must look for the PPPP, a place will be found for it. Favorites here? Deciduous Azaleas, they tantalize my brain cells with the fragrance, color, stature, form, you name it. I can't stop buying them, even though they get large and need some sun to flower well. But I love all the flowers, like Tina said, they are like my children.
    Frances

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  10. Frances,

    I knew that if I repeated PPPP's story often enough you would succumb to its charms! Political parties have used this technique for years....just keep repeating something until everyone believes it's true...except this is true, she is a lovely plant!

    Oh, I do love the fragrant native azaleas...and have thoroughly enjoyed your posts extolling their virtues.

    Gail

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  11. I just saw a phlox in a garden center today that reminded me of yours, but I couldn't remember the exact name, so I didn't buy it. You've won me over; I like anything that blooms a long time and spreads.
    My favorites? Purple coneflowers have to top the list, but the daylilies last all summer. And as for annuals--the Victoria Blue salvia, hands down.

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  12. rose,

    Lucky you to have Daylilies all summer, mine are gone by the end of July...

    Gail

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  13. Whatever's blooming at the moment. Actually, it might be Lobelia 'Monet Moment.' It is another one of those workhorse plants.
    Yesterday I noticed a bumblebee was trying to get at my PPP, which is in bud, but doesn't have any flowers yet. The poor confused bee gave up after three attempts.

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  14. MMD,

    I wonder where I shall place my attention once PPPP is gone for the season....I have a few Daylilies I love.

    My Monet's Moment disappeared and hasn't returned...too close to the dry Glade plants I fear....it was lovely.

    Gail

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  15. Like MMD I thought it was whatever's in bloom, but that might not be totally true. But whatever has my heart at a given moment will probably be in the onion family, like lilies or iris, or something in the buttercup family like clematis or columbine, rather than a daisy-type flower.... and don't hate me, Gail, but the odds are very slim that it will be pink!

    I am, however, glad you're matched up well with your favorite!

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose

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  16. Annie,

    Isn't it amazing that some of the most beautiful flowers are from the onion family and that Columbine is a member of the Ranunculous/buttercup clan. Pink works for the backyard and the phlox is carefree.

    Lilies are lovely and so are iris....I have them both.

    We are lucky there is so much choice in the gardening world for us.


    Gail

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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