Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Monday, January 21, 2013

Frost Flower Seed Giveaway

Dear Garden Bloggers, I've collected seeds from my Verbesina virginica and have 10 packets available to giveaway.

Frost Flower is one of the best of the  rough and tumble wildflowers that thrive in my garden. In case you've missed any of my posts extolling its virtues let me catch you up!

Verbesina virginica with its unusual white ray flowers is found on roadsides, woodlands and waste areas! It's a take care of itself plant that has enormous wildlife value for foraging pollinators  (carpenter, honey, bumbles and small tongued bees and butterflies) during late summer when gardens are winding down.  It’s such an important food source for Monarch Butterflies that it had been selected as a monitoring plant by Monarch Watch.
It really has a  lot going for it
  1. rough and tumble good looks, 
  2. it's a pollinator magnet
  3. drought tolerant 
  4. native species 
  5. it magically makes ice flowers on cold and frosty mornings
  6. Okay, it's not magic it's capillary action, but, I think that's magical.
It's a pretty spiffy wildflower.

One more thing! I need to tell you that I exercise just a wee bit of poetic license and call them Frost Flowers, but, when you look them up, you'll discover that they are commonly called Frostweed or Wingstem. What ever their name, they are a treat to see  in late summer and all fall when they're covered with pollinators or on a cold morning following a warm day when capillary action creates the ribbons of ice candy at the base of each stem.
xoxogail

Leave a comment and let me know if you're interested. If more than 10 people request seeds, then I will put all the names in a hat and Mr I will draw the winners and announce them here next Monday.

That's all you need to do...

Wonder if it will grow in your garden~Check out this map

I've written about Verbesina many times~It is after all a favorite of mine,  you can go to
An Almost Perfect Winter Flower here and  I Never Tire Of seeing Forst Flowers here

 Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission.

36 comments:

  1. I would love to have some seeds. Thanks so much for the opportunity.

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  2. I love plants that help the wildlife. I would have loved some of these seeds but when I looked them up it said they grow in shade or dappled shade which I just don't have. Thank you so much for the offer!

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    Replies
    1. yes, they grow on the edges of woods and full sun might be difficult, but a moist sunny spot is fine. gail

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  3. I hope I win! I hope I win! I hope I win! I'm only a tiny bit too far north into the white area and I really want to try. I'm sure you will need to find that hat!

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  4. Ooooh, I would love to try some Gail ;) They do look so unusual when they form the 'ribbons of ice'! Now here's a link to some 'real' frost flowers! : http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/12/frost-flowers-bloom-beautifully-in-arctic-ocean/

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  5. Me too, me too, please. I have the perfect place for the seeds.

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  6. I live in NJ, and wonder what year that map was produced. About 5 years ago the Dept of Agriculture reclassified us as 1/2 zone warmer, from 6B to 7A. I know some annuals I used to have to replant every year now resow themselves. Sweet alyssum is becoming a weed, overtaking parts of my front yard.

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  7. Too bad they won't grow where we live, it's just too cold, but I can live vicariously through your blog. They are so unusual...I have loved them since you first showed them.

    Jen

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    Replies
    1. Well phooey, but, they might not frost flower in your cold weather and vicarious is good.

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  8. Well, it's not native to this part of the country, but I'd still love to have it! I need more late season flowers! I have plenty of room for it.

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  9. Enjoyed the info about 'Frost Flowers' and the photos are exceptionally beautiful. I'm too far north for these beauties, too bad for me.

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  10. A beautiful flower, but not suitable for my Heath Hill. Alas.

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  11. Oh, darn....I'm too far north also...in upstate New York. They look intriguing tho'

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    Replies
    1. They are so lovely to see on those first cold mornings.

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  12. I have seen your previous photos of this and they are outstanding every time. I thought they are just remnants of the ice, I wonder how those white things form on those stems! Incredible beauty!

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    Replies
    1. Andrea, On a warm day plant saps moves upward and when the night cools down the sap bursts out and freezes. it's really cool.

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  13. I see by the map and by searching them out on Google that they will grow in FL. I'm in zone 10-b and hope that is not too far south. We won't be seeing any frost flowers down here though, so I'll have to enjoy yours.

    Have a great week ~ FlowerLady

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  14. Too bad they do not grow here...I have long admired them...what a great giveaway Gail.

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  15. Connie near Little River CanyonJanuary 22, 2013 at 6:55 AM

    I would love to win those seeds, too and begin growing this plant on Lookout Mountain in Alabama. Also would like you to know how much I enjoy your blog! Thanks!

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  16. I would love some seeds. I am in zone 7b, in North Carolina, so they should do well for me. Thanks for the offer! I love your blog.

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  17. Heidi/ IN woodland gardenJanuary 22, 2013 at 8:00 AM

    We have wingstem all over our woods and along our dry creek bed. I didn't know that was the flower you were talking about with the wonderful frosty/frothy "blooms". I'm going to have to take a hike and check ours out!! sooo cool!!

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  18. I, too, am in Middle Tennessee and I'd love some! I can't wait for this chill to lift so I can get to some cleaning up and planning! Thanks for the offer...

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  19. I would like to enter the drawing for the seeds. I enjoy your blog very much. My grandmother always had the most wonderful garden(flowers & veggies) and I am determined to be as much like her as I can. Thank you.
    Becki

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  20. Yes, put me in the hat. I was so hoping it would grow in our area (piney woods of east Texas).

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  21. Darn, I'm about 55 miles north of the Illinois border. I wonder if I could grow it in one of my garden's microclimate spots. Oh well, I guess I'd best defer to those who are firmly planted in its zone. I certainly do appreciate its beauty, though!

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  22. Oooh, I've long admired your frost flowers. I'd love a chance to win a packet of seeds Gail! I see they're native here.

    They might just love it in our garden. We definitely have the right light conditions for them here, and it seems they might be tough enough for even our garden. If they're deer-resistant as it seems they are, maybe the bunnies would leave them alone too.

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  23. Gail, I am in the SE corner of Nebraska, just outside the range. I wonder if they would grow here. If you think they would, and I win a drawing, I could split a packet with someone else.

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  24. Please put my name in the hat, and thank you!

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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