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Friday, December 7, 2012

Pollinator Condo Open to Invertebrate Residences



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Gardener provides homes for native bees, beetles and beneficial insects in new condo.

Nashville, TN~December 7, 2012 Local wildlife gardener Gail Eichelberger has built a pollinator condo, named Pollinator Tower, for native Carpenter Bees, small bees, beetles and even a few beneficial insects.

When asked if this kind of artificial habitat will be attractive, she said, "Pollinators are rather picky when it comes to where they nest and rear their young, rooms have been constructed to appeal to a wide range of residents." 

Apartments/rooms will have small and large pre-drilled holes, pithy stems preferred by small carpenter bees and straws and hollow bamboo for mason bees. In addition, there's unpainted wood for Carpenter Bees, logs with loose bark for beetles, twigs, bark, leaves, lichen and even stacked roof shingles for critters like Lady Bugs seeking shelter. 

Pollinator Tower is open, but, construction is continuing on the rooms through the winter. She expects the majority of residents to begin moving in next Spring. "When solitary bees emerge from their winter homes in the spring they'll be looking for accommodations to rear their young. I'm hoping that the Tower's sunny location and close proximity to a wildflower garden will appeal to them and the many varieties of native pollinators." 

Historically, insect condominiums have been popular in Europe where deforestation has led to a decline in natural habitats. Here in the states it's not unusual to find them at botanical gardens or zoos where they are important educational tools. Gail believes that providing a habitat for native bees and other pollinators is necessary for urban and suburban gardeners who want to have success with growing vegetables, fruit or flowers. "When you consider that many of these gardens are set in a landscape devoid of a natural habitat it has become essential to provide artificial ones. I hope Pollinator Tower is an inspiration to others. They are easy to build, require minimal expense, use recycled materials and are fun to design and decorate."

The grand opening is Monday, December 10, 2012. Stop by Clay and Limestone.com when Gail will share the Tower's story, photos and details on materials and the building process.


*Bobbie Peachey clip art

Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone. She reminds all that the words and images are the property of the author and cannot be used without written permission.

27 comments:

  1. How wonderful, dear Gail! It looks right at home in your garden, the new residence tower. May it be filled with happy pollinators soon!
    xoxoxo
    Frances

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    1. I do hope so Frances, It was a fun project and has inspired me to make smaller ones....and redo this part of the garden. xoxo...

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  2. Very nice! I have been thinking of building one for some time and have been looking for inspiration pieces and ideas! I hope the pollinators take up residence come spring!

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    1. karin, It's easy peasy to make and I'll show everyone on Monday's post.

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  3. How wonderful that you have made this. I made a small bee house and they moved in almost immediately. I hope you have such luck. I have this on my list of garden projects too. I have collected ideas from visits to England where they really go to town on such projects.

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    1. I am not surprised that the bee houses are being used. Like us they like being close to their gardens. The UK condos have inspired me, too. I'll have closeups on Monday!

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  4. Love this Gail! I'm quite sure that plenty of insects will find your luxury accommodations hospitable and you'll receive 5 stars from Lonely Planet (Pollinators Edition)!

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  5. I'm looking forward to seeing and reading more about this new edifice at C&L!

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  6. Wonderful residential development, Gail. I bee lookin' forward to the first move-ins!

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  7. love this NEWS!!...will you provide plans for development elsewhere?

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  8. Now that is one development that is not going to be protested against. There will be no NIMBY's going not in my back yard.

    It's on my list, next to a mason bee house.

    Jen

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  9. I like this idea a lot. I'll have to work on something like this in my garden.

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  10. Looking forward to hearing all about it Gail!

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  11. Looking forward to the continued story of the how and who...

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  12. Love the way you wrote this in the form of a proper press release! Very fun, and very well done! Good luck with the grand opening!

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  14. I love it! Can't wait to read more about how you built it.

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  15. Love this Gailie! Maybe when I get my little meadow started I can add one of these to the mix...xxxx Lynn

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    1. I will help you! I so need to visit with you. xoxo

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  16. I hadn't heard of such a thing before, but it sounds excellent! Can't wait to see who moves in!

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  17. I've never heard of one of these before but what a great idea, and nice looking as well. Can't wait to hear about your new tenants.

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  18. As usual, you're such an inspiration! I've been thinking of doing a smaller version in my little yard and love your design. Looking forward to your "how-to" and already trying to think of things I could recycle/repurpose into one.

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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