Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Monday, February 13, 2012

Plant More Natives In 2012


The critters will thank you!

Hover Fly on Spiderwort
I plant natives because it makes sense for the difficult conditions in my garden~ (You know that shallow clay soil that's sticky wet all winter and dry as concrete all summer.) After the drought last summer and fall and an already saturated 2012,  planting Central Basin natives makes even more sense to me.
late spring border of mostly natives with native friendly exotics
They never let me down and more importantly, they never drown. (Not The Climate For Xeric)
Downy Woodmint/Blephilia ciliata
I plant natives because they provide habitat for birds, butterflies and other wildlife. (Gardening For Wildlife)  But, not just any old native plant makes the  Clay and Limestone cut.  They also  have to be tough, attractive and make me smile. 


I've already started on my list~This past week I planted Dodecatheon meadia/Shooting Star, found Hydrangea quercifolia/Oakleaf Hydrangeas on sale,  bought a marvelous native 
Rhamnus caroliniana/buckthorn,  decided to try an Neviusia alabamensis/Alabama snow-wreath and I haven't even gotten to the summer and fall blooming perennials! (earlier post)

Join me and let's make 2012 the year we plant more natives.  The critters will thank you, but, I pinky swear, that you'll be even happier than the bees. 

xxoogail


Gail Eichelberger is a gardener and therapist in Middle Tennessee. She loves wildflowers and native plants and thoroughly enjoys writing about the ones she grows at Clay and Limestone."

22 comments:

  1. By planting natives, you do add a whole new dimension to gardening--the inclusion of wild things. I find it fascinating to watch the local ecosystem at work.

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  2. I am working on doing just that, Gail, thanks to your influence!!!! It seems more natives are becoming available, too, at nurseries and online. That helps. Also, allowing the *weeds* to grow and flower to better help identify the good guys that already want to grow in one's garden is the easiest of all. Your garden is beautiful, proof of natives knowing how to grow in not so perfect conditions.
    xxxooo
    Frances

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  3. I love your Monday Natives talk. You do inspire us all. I have more natives than ever, and it's mostly because of you my friend.~~Dee

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  4. Just reading all this makes me itchy to get out there. Unfortunaely it is cold here now. Winter finally decided to show up. Expecting 1-2 inches of snow any time now. One can dream though.

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  5. I couldn't agree with the title of this post more! I've two seed flats with native plant seedlings on the greenhouse propagation bench at the moment. The native yarrow I sowed is just screaming to be transplanted already. I love the photo of the downy woodmint, I bet the bumble bees love it!

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    1. Clare, The bees love Downy Woodmint. It was a treasure I found growing in the 'lawn' of my way back backyard along with Western Daisy and a few other native wildflowers. I've been trying to get yarrow established as a lawn substitute...It's such a fine plant. gail

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  6. I'm in. I will plant more natives this year. After all, I have the perfect growing conditions for the plants native to my area!

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    1. You do and you have nice soil! Prairie plants would love your garden.

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  7. Makes life easier with natives, that is for sure. You have helped spur many of us on!

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    1. Thank you Janet, that's music to my ears.

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  8. 2012 for sure, it is becoming such a necessity I fear. The temps alone will help the go native moment along.

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    1. I think you're right...and hasn't this winter been a strange one!

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  9. I go native ever place I can. It makes gardening way more enjoyable with much less constant work. Gives me the time to sit back and enjoy the gardens here on the shore of Lake Michigan. They "naturally" do well. Obviously! Win win for everybody. Jack

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    1. It really is a win-win and so many of our locally native plants are stunning additions to the garden.

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  10. Natives do do great here in TN! Seeing those warmer pictures sure makes me wish they were a bit closer!

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    1. I am ready, too. I would like a few days of dry weather, too.

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  11. I have natives on my list for this year. A new one is Agastache!

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    1. Pat, That's a great plant! The pollinators will thank you and I do believe that some birds love their seeds.

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  12. Ah, an excuse for more plant shopping. :)

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  13. I taught a plant ID class to local Master Gardeners this past Sat. and I realized that most of the plants that I reccomend as super easy for our area and that are tolerant of many conditions, are SE coastal natives. Look to the native landscape for what will do best in your garden - but you know that!

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  14. It looks at if there were plants on the bnch awaiting there planting. Great photo of the zipper spider.

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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