Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Friday, February 11, 2011

Winter Asters

 Asters*,  the stars of Autumn,  have a  have a second life at Clay and Limestone each winter. 



 Asters (as they were known then) and other endemic Central Basin natives grew with happy abandon in the forested woodland where C and L now stands.  Sixty years ago a neighborhood was carved from the woods and a house was built.  Homeowners came and went,  while  the asters grew quietly  on the woodland  edge.  Twenty five years ago this brand new  gardener fell head over heals in love with the blue clouds of flowers that were covered with bees and butterflies in the yard of her new home.  They  so captured my heart,  that I built a garden  around them.   I've allowed them to  root and seed  themselves with abandon.  Symphyotrichum shortii, Symphyotrichum cordifolium, Symphyotrichum dumosus, Eurybia divaricata, Symphyotrichum lateriflorum, Symphyotrichum priceae, and Symphyotrichum ericoides var. ericoides  have  spilled into the paths,  crept into the wildflower beds and  cozied  up to the benches all over Clay and Limestone.


Each fall they fade to  seedy gorgeousness.


They  spill over  into the paths, 


they creep into the wildflower beds and,

 they cozy up to the benches.
 
Where they have become the stars of my winter garden.





Isn't nature grand!


xxoogail

More on Clay and Limestone's asters
Little Asters Everywhere (here)
Natives For Fall Color (here)
This Is The Place To Bee (here)
Central Basin Wildflowers (here)

This post was written by Gail Eichelberger for my blog Clay and Limestone Copyright 2011.This work protected under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Please contact me for permission to copy, reproduce, scrape, etc.

25 comments:

  1. These are so refreshingly beautiful in their death and decay, dear Gail. What perfect captures of the perfection in winter's long sleep. :-)
    xxxooo
    Frances

    ReplyDelete
  2. My asters are quite an attraction to the Dark-eyed Juncos, Song Sparrow, White-throated Sparrows and more. These birds spend all winter picking through the aster seeds. And as always, your photos are lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yes, Gail, Nature is grand and beautiful. You winter garden is the example on just how beautiful a garden can be in the winter with seed head splendor.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Most of our asters are flattened under more than a foot of snow. I love how you captured the "starness" of them.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Love the post, love the pictures. Love that blue bench. And now am formulating a cunning plan, one that involves my resident carpenter.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Indeed it is grand. I share your love of asters and most all other natives. Mz Poison Ivy and I are at odds but when I see the birds eating the berries I can't complain too much. Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A beautiful post, dear Gail, and indeed grand and winter wonderful as artfully captured in your words/ images.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Gail, you've captured their beauty so well! I love the photo of the aster "cozying up" to the winter bench. The first aster I planted was one of those mounded asters, name forgotten, like the ones sold everywhere with mums in the fall. I'm so glad I've found the natives now--they are indeed the real stars of the autumn garden.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Gail, your writing is as lovely as the stars which fill your winter garden. You show your love for them by the way in which you write of their beauty. Thank you.~~Dee

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi Gail, your last photo is wonderful! Your asters give your garden a blowzy, romantic quality, and I agree that their winter appearance is also very beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Gail, I love your winter garden stars! I love that you are out there appreciating and photographing them, and that you leave them in place for hungry winter birds.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your asters are indeed beautiful in all seasons. I'm sure I've said this before but I'll say it again - I covet that purple bench. It's such an eye catching piece and the colour just makes me giddy.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Gail, I love the fact you are so passionate about your flowers.
    I love you allow them to re-seed with such gay abandon.
    I love your style .....I love the way you spread the word.

    Beautiful images...

    Have a lovely weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I agree, Asters have a lovely aesthetic quality in winter, long after the flowers have faded. I was surprised to see so many of our native asters still clinging to their seeds last week, but had fun knocking the seeds off, and scattering them around, in the hopes of seeing more asters blooming this year!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Beautiful. I must see about some in my garden as I love that blue.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Your macro shots of the long gone flowers and seed heads are lovely. So much detail and beauty in the muted colors and textures.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Nature is indeed grand...it seems like it was only last week that we had asters in the gardens, and now, we don't have anything but sheets and drifts and duvets of white snow...burying all but the tallest of perennial stalks and shrubs. But the beauty of that is that soon, we'll be back into the joy of bulbs and annuals and perennials and and and...and we'll forget all about the winter, won't we?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Ah, it was all easier when they were just called asters wasn't it? lol I prefer your tag of ex-aster. :)

    I agree, if there's room, one cannot have too many asters. There's something about those blues and purples that are so magical, especially when so much else that is blooming that late in the season is yellow. And of course the flying creatures love them too!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Asters have just been noted on my "add more of these" list for my corner of Katy. Thanks, Gail ... even if they're not as pretty in winter here as they are at C&L, they will more than earn their keep.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Beautiful photos of your winter garden. I too love the way asters seed around with reckless abandon making the garden feel as if it had always been there, adding beauty not only in the fall, but the winter as well.

    ReplyDelete
  21. So lovely in your photos! I should get some asters seeds to spread around here -- maybe there would be enough that the bunnies wouldn't eat all of them!

    Hope you're doing well. Warm weather coming!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Yes, Mother Nature is grand. Sometimes I think I enjoy the graceful dying shots as much as I do the vibrant colors of youth. You've captured their essence!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Lovely illustration of how some plants look just as beautiful after flowering. I am currently looking for an aster that will thrive in partial shade on my heavy soil, this was a welcome reminder that it is worth doing!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I cut back most of my ex-asters because they self-sow a bit too prolifically for my taste, but you've got me thinking I should show a bit more restraint next fall. They are lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  25. They will always be asters to me. My memory is not so great.

    Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete

Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails