Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Wildflower Wednesday~The Toothworts

Cardamine concatenata~ Cutleaf Toothwort
Cutleaf Toothwort was the first wildflower to introduce itself to me  at  Clay and Limestone.   It was my first spring in the house  and I spent as much time as I could manage to carve away from my busy life as a wife, mother and a part time therapist in the garden.



I remember being charmed by the nodding bell flowers on that  long ago spring morning. It was blooming  here and there on the edges of the then grassy area. Growing near it were other wildflowers~Columbines, Trillium, Dutchmen's Breeches  and Spring Beauty.   It's been more then  25 years and my spirits still lift  when I see the first spring blooms of the toothworts.


Cardamine diphylla~Broadleaf Toothwort offers winter color
 A few years ago I added  Broadleaf Toothwort (Cardamine diphylla) to the woodland garden. It's  evergreen and the leaves persist after the flower fades and goes to seed.  Both toothwort's native range is the Eastern United States  and parts of Canada.   It is found in moist woodlands usually in edge habitats.  If it's happy you can plan on a small colony of pretty flowers every spring. It will spread by root and seed.  But, don't worry, it isn't aggressive; it's just charming.



If you look closely a the flowers of toothwort~You can see their mustard family four petaled, pink or white cross shaped flowers. The nectar of the flowers attracts  honey bees, bumblebees, Mason bees, Cuckoo bees (Nomadine), Miner bees, Green Metallic Bees and other  Halictid bees, and Andrenid bees.  You know that makes me happy!
xxoogail

 Welcome to Clay and Limestone's Wildflower Wednesday celebration. WW is about sharing and celebrating wildflowers from all over this great big, beautiful world. Join us on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Please add your url to Mr Linky and leave a comment.

This post was written by Gail Eichelberger for my blog Clay and Limestone Copyright 2011. Please contact me for permission to copy, reproduce, scrape, etc.

33 comments:

  1. Such a delightful wildflower Gail.
    I love the colour and bell shaped blooms, they remind me a little of our native bluebell.

    I remember so well when we first moved into the farmhouse, walking the garden that first spring and being so excited as the spring flowers arrived. It is such an exciting time.....like you though, it still thrills me to see the start of another season and all the beauty that it offers.

    Lovely post.

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  2. Dear Gail, the wildflowers that find us, rather than us finding them are the best! Your toothwort is charming, I love those nodding bells. There may be a place for a plant such as that somewhere in Fairegarden-NC. :-)
    xxxooo
    Frances

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  3. Gail,

    I did a post on these plants about a year ago, found a valley full of them. Also reported to be a host for the Falcate Orangetip butterfly.

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  4. Ah, the lovely toothworts... a funny name for a beautiful flower!

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  6. I have not seen this wildflower in my woods. I will look for it this spring but it probably likes that clay soil which you are so famous for in your garden.

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  7. Such a pretty thing, too bad it would hate my garden. Anything that needs it moist just won't work here.

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  8. Gail, those are such beautiful captures of delicate little lovelies. Their common name is so sweet - I wonder if it was used as remedy for tooth pain?

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  9. Very lovely Gail. I don't grow Toothwort but think I need to try. I wish some would come find me.

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  10. Those little bells are charming. I have to tell you that the PPP that you sent last year has stayed evergreen here. I was amazed. I didn't know they did that. It is now peeking out from under the melting snow. Ican't wait to see it bloom.

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  11. Making it a garden resolution for this year to join you each month.

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  12. I love wildflowers and will start posting to the meme next month...ran out of time this month...lovely posts from everyone!!!

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  13. Lisa, I am so glad Phlox pilosa is happy in your garden That's one of the many reasons that it's Practically Perfect! gail

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  14. Your picture are a delight to see.

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  15. They look lovely! I'm sorry that my conditions are too dry!

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  16. Hi Gail,
    We have the cut-leaved toothwort in our Minnesota woods. A great wildflower indeed. Thanks for highlighting these.
    Heather

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  17. This is a new wildflower to me, Gail, but I can see why you are so taken with these lovely nodding blooms.

    Oh my, I completely forgot it was time for Wildflower Wednesday! I'm afraid I've run out of unused photos from the summer, and there is nothing at all blooming outside in the snow here. I'll try to get creative and join you again in February!

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  18. Nice! Not much happening here yet. This cold seems to be keeping the vegetation fairly dormant.

    Gail on your last line that you put in to thwart the feedscrapers make your webpage as active link. That way if someone happens to land on their illegally stolen content pages that person can find his or her way home!

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  19. Thank you! Those grow wild all around our property, but I never tried to track down the info. Glad to know "who" is growing where our meadow meets the wooded edges.

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  20. Lovely photos! I so enjoy learning about plants that live elsewhere...I've never heard of that before.

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  21. What an odd name for such a pretty flower. I loved your metallic bee post and this flower is a favorite, good to know. You got some stunning images of the Toothwort, very nice.

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  22. It is a charming little flower. I must pay more attention to our way back woods...

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  23. Gail I am a big fan of Toothwort too. I have the Cutleaf species. Your photos are so lovely!

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  24. What a sweet little bloom, I will have to keep my eyes peeled for one in my garden...who knows what will pop up this spring?

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  25. Dear Gail, This is a lovely post! I love how your wildflowers introduce themselves to you! So sweet. Toothwort somehow does not seem worthy of such a delicate beauty! Your photos are really capture the charm of this plant. I am so weary this week from painting . . . I will be late with my wildflower post . . . that will be wild but not quite flowery. I hope that is OK!

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  26. A totally lovely post,

    Thanks!

    Lisa

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  27. I'm participating for the first time in Wildflower Wednesday. I don't actually have any flower pictures, but lots of emerging foliage. I hope that counts!

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  28. I love toothworts! Your photos of them definitely do them justice... thanks for drawing attention to their simple, graceful blooms.

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  29. Gail,
    OK, I've added posting on Wildflower Wednesdays to my blog list!

    Cheers,
    Lisa

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  30. Hmmm.... lovely! And I'm certain it could do for me! I shall see if I can obtain seeds from overseas...

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  31. Gail, you showcased such wonderful plants. I love this meme. I wish I had more natives to focus upon.~~Dee

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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