Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Bloom Day September '09

Anemone hupehensis 'September Charm'

Mary Oliver wrote:
"Every day I walk out into the world
to be dazzled,
then to be reflective."

Silphium perfoliatum dressed for the season

I hope always to be dazzled by the world,

Rudbeckia hirta

To appreciate the beauty in the spent flower

Gaura lindheimeri 'Whirling Butterflies'

To rejoice in the one bloom, when I hoped for many.

Salvia azurea

To remember to celebrate that flowers can survive even the hungriest moths
and bloom the bluest blue.

Southern Crimson Moth posing on Salvia nemorosa 'May Night'

To have a generous heart that welcomes all visitors,
including a new moth that wants to eat all the salvias.

One of the many asters I have trouble id-ing

To appreciate the life I have right here, right now.


Symphyotrichum novae-angliae 'Alma Potschke'

To look, really look, at each and everything.

Rudbeckia Herbstonne **

To embrace the imperfect that is life.

Heterotheca Villosa 'Ruth Baumgardner' a gift from Frances, of Fairegarden

To celebrate family and friends.

Gaura lindheimeri 'Passionate Rainbow'

Welcome to Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day celebration September 2009 at Clay and Limestone. It's not quite through being summer here, but it's clear that fall is in the air. There will be more later, as the asters and other fall blooming natives come into their own.


Physostegia virginiana with a bumble.

Don't forget to buzz over to May Dreams Gardens to see Carol, hostess extraordinaire, for a links to Bloom Day posts around the globe!

Thank you for stopping by on this busiest of days for bloggers. Be dazzled out there!

Gail

**'Herbstonne' is varyingly sold as a cultivar of either Rudbeckia nitida or Rudbeckia laciniata, however some experts maintain that it is actually a hybrid between the two species. 'Herbstonne' is synonymous with 'Autumn Sun'

48 comments:

  1. Dear Gail, the coffee has not had time to kick in, but your post has already brightened my day. Thanks too for the link love. Isn't Ruth the most wonderful yellow aster? Your words should be bronzed. Finding the beauty in the mundane makes for a happy life full of continuous smiles. :-)
    Frances

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  2. All your photos are very nice, but I especially liked that fact that you showed fading flowers, a rudbeckia with one petal left and a dried seed head. I think gardeners have a unique ability to see beauty in all stages of life (at least that is what I am going to tell my aging self). Happy GBBD!

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  3. Frances, You are very kind and I think Ruth is the most amazing yellow aster. She began blooming this weekend... I am celebrating the rain today~ I won't have to drag the hose around today~ Have a wonderful day my friend ~gail

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  4. Fantastic show of all your pretty flowers.

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  5. Gail Girl !
    I am a fan of Herbstonne too "nitida" is the cultivar I have and she is a tall strong beauty !
    The grape and kiwi vine are hiding her now since they have matured .. so Spring will be moving day for her .. I hope she doesn't mind too much ;-)
    I have never seen the glass as half empty .. there is always something in it .. and every day things to me are special .. everyday ! .. I appreciate that gift given to me .. it has gotten me through more than most people could take .. it has turned me into a rather off kilter? goofy? gal .. but .. I'm HERE ! LOL
    Joy : )

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  6. Gail, I luv how you mentioned all the life lessons we learn from our flowers; beauty in the spent bloom, appreciating a lone bloom, the survivors, the welcoming hearts, embracing the imperfect, celebrating family and friends. I like your 'Whirling Butterflies'. I made mention of you and your blog in my GBBD post.

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  7. What a beautiful post! The sentiments and blooms alike were a wonderful way to start the day. Now, I need to get to work, and look forward to reading the post with those awesome looking morning glories when I get home. Have a good day!

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  8. Beautiful! I love the withered flowers. That crimson moth is particularly striking and I love your gift from Frances!

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  9. The rudbeckia with the single petal is such a perfect fall/end of summer shot. Frances has great taste in flowers doesn't she!

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  10. Hi Gail, love the spent blooms -- seed heads are wonderful to leave for the birds -- goldfinches LOVE rudbeckia! Your Salvia azurea looks like a pumped up salvia or a snapdragon! Love that blue.

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  11. Such nice sentiments on this September day. I like the promises for sure and need to make them too! Beautiful flowers.

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  12. Beautiful flowers and beautiful sentiments on a beautiful day for bloom day. Thanks for so faithfully joining in each month!

    Carol, May Dreams Gardens

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  13. What a lovely presentation! You obviously put a lot of thought and effort into getting the quotation with the photos in the right order.

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  14. What a lovely presentation! You obviously put a lot of thought and effort into getting the quotation with the photos in the right order.

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  15. What a lovely post, Gail! Once again, I am reminded how fortunate your clients are to have you helping them. I should make a plaque of this post to look at each day to remind me to take pleasure in the little things, the imperfect. I have been trying to overlook the imperfections in the garden this fall and focus on the positive; now if I could only do the same in the rest of life!

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  16. Thanks for reminding everyone to appreciate the beauty of a faded or imperfect flower. Autumn is in the wings at Clay & Limestone, that's for sure. I love the Crimson Moth. I don't think we have them around here. Your mystery "Aster" looks very familiar. I'll have to give it some thought.

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  17. Hi Gail, lovely photos. I have Alma Potschke too and really love it. Your salvia is beautiful, moth and all.
    Marnie

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  18. I too am learning to appreciate 'all' of the imperfections that come with gardening....about the gaura, do you prune yours. I have two that are so out of control,(funny after my first comment) not sure if I should just leave them alone or what...

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  19. I just picked up a 'Herbstonne' on sale, the last one. I didn't know a thing about it, but I can't wait to see it much larger next year! I'm going to a priaire today, so hope to get some good fading bloom pics.

    That Aster isn't an Aste laevis is it?

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  20. There are so many more blues in the late garden than I remember. I like your Physostegia virginiana. The bumbles and the butterflies seem extra busy in the gardens this September.

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  21. That first photo absolutely made my heart smile!!! Kim

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  22. Gail, I'm up here now determined to embrace the imperfect. Thoughtful post, beautiful flowers, great bugs. Happy blooms day.

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  23. Your post did justice to that Mary Oliver poem. Lovely writing to go along with your plants.

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  24. I am dazzled by all the flowers, even in a time of transition, Gail. Happy Bloom Day to you!

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  25. Gail asked me to let you all know that she appreciates you stopping by and she wants very much to come visit you all but her internet service is down. No repair can be done until Friday. There is hair all over the floor from her own hands pulling it, she wishes to express her regrets and will visit as soon as possible.

    The Management
    typed by secretary Don

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  26. Very beautiful. I'm glad you included the faded flowers.

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  27. I'm going to get out a tin of spray and make my little white moths that pretty red colour too. I've never understood the name 'Whirling Butterflies' until I saw your photo - makes perfect sense - excellent photo illustration. Wish it was more reliable here - it's so very pretty.

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  28. Oh dear. No Internet until Friday? I would be pulling my hair out too. Good thing you got this most beautiful post up before it crashed. The floral portraits are lovely but the prose is the best. We should all take those words to heart.
    ps. I would LOVE to have some salvia azurea seeds. I feel like it's my lucky day! Thank you so much for offering.
    Happy bloom day!

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  29. Gail,
    What a lovely post!

    And I connected to your Halloween post from last year in a 'Renovating the Garden' program this morning -- they liked it, to be sure.

    'm trying to encourage them to SEE their gardens and their promise (after editing) and maybe they'll visit your posts, too.

    Cheers,
    Lisa

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  30. What a great post! I'm not sure what kind of asters those are, but they're lovely, and so is the 'Alma Potschke'. (Did I spell that right?)

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  31. Gail, what a beautiful post! I love the sigle petal on the rudbeckia. Your asters are wonderful, especially the yellow. And I saw a must have-the whirling butterflies. Wow!

    Thanks for a lovely bloom day post.:)

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  32. Gail - how thoughtful your post is today. There is always hope in the spent bloom, as it makes seed for the next dazzling show. Happy GBBD.

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  33. Hi Gail! Your post was so nice... I should have a cup of tea and read it again! :-) Thank you so much for showing "spent" flowers and imperfect blossoms. I love it. I identify with those sometimes. ;-)

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  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  35. You're so right Gail, there is no point in wishing for perfection, it just leads to a sea of boring green grass and concrete. Sadly, a lot of non-gardeners don't understand that imperfection is part of the beauty and character of a garden, and some of the comments I get from well-meaning relatives drive me crazy!

    A lovely and well-thought-out post. I always enjoy reading your blog.

    PS You captured that lovely fuzzy quality and beautiful clear blue of Salvia azurea perfectly.

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  36. Lovely photos... and wonderful words. Your post was a great way to start off my day, Gail. :)

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  37. Somehow you even manage to make the dead flowers look good, Gail! But I especially love that gorgeous pink moth on the even more gorgeous salvia....

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  38. "...To appreciate the life I have right here, right now."

    Words to live by...and always a struggle for me.

    Thank you Gail, dear friend, for a beautiful post!

    xxxooo Lynn

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  39. I love that photo of the Rudi with just one petal left hanging limply. It reminds me of my poor little MIL who just lost her Husband of 68 years. She is just barely hanging on, overwhelmed with what life will be like now. Sigh~~

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  40. What a lovely, inspiring post Gail! I couldn't agree more with these wonderful sentiments. I must admit I've never really thought much about the beauty of spent blooms, but after reading this and seeing your lovely photos, I'll see them differently from now on.

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  41. A beautiful post! There's nothing like gardening to make you focus on the details that make life so beautiful:)

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  42. Hi folks~~Thank you so much for taking the time to stop by and leave a comment! Blogging is the cake and comments make for a delicious icing.

    Gail

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  43. the joy in our lives really comes from slowing down and enjoying every part of life. the stages of growth in flowers and in our own lives reflect these things. it seems to take us half our lives to figure this out. your september blooms are lovely even the ones that are almost spent.
    happy september, gail.

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  44. Gail~
    So many beautiful blossoms. I like your new sidebar picture of your bench and sweet susans!
    ~Karrita

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  45. I don't know that I have seen Whirling Butterflies before, I wonder if they could handle some desert heat in a container -- because now I definitely want them!!!

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  46. I do see the beauty in the spent flowers, its the same beauty i used to see sometimes in my grandmother while she was still living, or in an autumn sunset, once the leaves have fallen, something maternal and natural, accomplished and satisfied, beautiful and wise in its age.

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  47. Dear Gail,
    A 'perfectly' wonderful post with so many pretty blooms. When once the gardener understands this philosophy and embraces the small wonders and every aspect of our gardens... we are much more satisfied in our daily visits as we let the garden nurture our souls.

    Thank you for the reminder as I am busily digging out even more sod yesterday and today.
    Hugs to you, dear friend.

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  48. Ooh, I like the white gaura; I've grown them for the first time this year; one is bright orange and one pink. I like them! And Japanese anemone is all the rage here in my garden too--I have white, pink, purple, and a double one that's magenta-ish. :)

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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