Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Just a Few Flowers For You~~


Would you mind helping me celebrate the return of my camera?
 
 "Georgia Blue"  and look at all the blues


I can't think of any other folks who would be as thrilled  as I am about this news!

 
PJM Rhododendrum~

Even after a year of blogging, my non-blogging friends often don't get the connection

Anemonella thalictroides/Rue-Anemone

I have to the garden blogging community...to you.



They don't know what they're missing!


Who else would appreciate the tiny spider I found on this  Iberis?


Or, know how deeply I am affected by a dozen blooms on a Rusty Blackhaw.


Only, another gardener would know what it's like to see the first bloom of a species tulip.  To delight at the color combinations that  nature puts together!


Phacelia bipinnatifida

You appreciate and notice  the little things...like this  hairy little plant that frequents our woodlands.


You see the tulip, but also the bloom on a rosemary and wonder, "What is that yellow flower in the background?"  It's Kerria/Japanese Rose! 

...and isn't it lovely~~
The single flowered variety is my favorite~~


Thank you for being here to help me celebrate.   

  Aren't we fortunate to know folks who can look at a  faded crocus and  see its beauty?

Warmest thoughts  for you all on this rainy Wednesday.

Gail

You can enlarge any photo by clicking on it!

58 comments:

  1. I'll be back...out doing gardening chores! I will read all your comments, answer questions and visit your blogs! Thank you for taking the time to stop by and visit with me! gail

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  2. I am so glad your camera is back! Have a great day(-:

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  3. Glad to see your camera is all better. The photos are lovely!

    I do have a question about one of them - what is a species tulip? I have a flower that comes back every year that looks very similiar to your picture except mine is red where yours is fuchsia.

    Sherri

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  4. I'm so glad you are reunited with your camera friend. The photos are all beautiful, and I especially like the spider--it fits right in with the iberis. Also, what is it about non-blogging gardening friends? Not ONE of mine has ever left a comment on my blog! Helllllo?! :)

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  5. Gail,

    Great news that your camera was repaired! :-)

    Is the Kerria deer resistant? I've always admired that one, but I'd have to grow it on the perimeter of my outer gardens, putting it in the deer path.

    Cameron

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  6. I'm so happy you have your camera back, Gail! I bet you had fun roaming around the garden and finding all these beauties to photograph. I agree, my non-blogging friends and family (which includes almost everyone!) don't appreciate all these precious details. Your garden certainly has come to life--thanks for sharing with us.

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  7. Hallelujah, Gail ... you're back in 'top form' with your touching post. In awe photographing my garden, my heart beats like yours. So many beauties but your trillium, a 'favorite' favorite. Enjoy :)

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  8. Yeah on the return of the camera and your wonderful flowers! My kerria is also blooming-a welcomed sight. I have the double. Love it!

    Cameron, yes kerria is deer resistant. All parts poisonous. We profiles it in my plant class last year and the guy who presented was sure to warn us because of pets.

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  9. Celebrate we will. I am doing the "happy dance for you"

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  10. Love the trillium, one of my favorites. The last photo had me stumped;) I thought it was crepe paper, LOL.
    Marnie

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  11. I'm sharing your joy, Gail! And what a celebration you're having with these gorgeous photos!
    Yes, the details are so exciting to notice.
    What a sweet little spider on the candytuft :)
    And oh, the blues...and pinks..and, well, everything! Those pink tulips are glorious!
    Welcome back to your camera! Enjoy your garden..and don't get wet! Must've stopped raining if you're out there :)

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  12. Oh Gail, what a surprise!!! Your camera is doing better than before even, or is that just my imagination? Everything is exquisite, and the happiness in your voice comes across loud and clear. Yes, we do see the beauty, even in a spent crocus. Your photos speak volumes.
    Frances

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  13. My husband said we could have worse addictions! Lovely flowers and I see the one before the faded crocus blooms is a trillium, I want some of those!!

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  14. Wonderful, Gail! And great shots (as usual). Loved that you included the faded crocus as well as those yellow blooms- Japanese rose-in the background. I'd have wondered, and wondered!!! Beautiful post...and happy gardening!

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  15. Thanks! I'm glad that Wednesday wasn't wordless, I would have missed the spider ;->

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  16. Town Mouse, I don't like to be wordless! Isn't the spider perfect! Glad you saw it!

    Kanak, Thank you for the sweet comment!
    I like articles in flower magazines with identified flowers...so I thought you all might, too!

    Darla, Mine, too says something like that..and I think he envies me feeling so passionate about blogging!

    kerrie, It's raining quite hard...and the photos are from yesterday. I have mixed feelings...I love the sun but the rain gives me time to hang out here!

    Marnie, It really does look like crepe paper...but you can just see the purple stigmas/stamens!

    Keewee, Thank you..I love a good happy dance! I think I'll join you!

    Tina, The double is a cutie pie, too... I am thrilled to have my camera back....

    Joey, The trilliums are quite special! I have a few varieties but these are actually from my wayback backyard and even more precious! Do you have them near your cabin?

    Rose, Thank you...First I saw the box on the front stoop and there was the Illinois address...I was thrilled and puzzled! It was just wrapped in bubble wrap inside a small box. I double boxed it and sent it so well protected! tI am thrilled to have it back and find myself putting the strap around my neck for added protection!

    Cameron, Good news about the Kerria...It has the best green stems in the winter that look great! It will fit right in your garden!


    Gail

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  17. Cindee, You, too...and thank you!

    Monica, It's amazing to me that none, I mean zero of my non-blogging gardening friends ever comment or visit (that I am aware of)!

    Sheri, This little tulip is T humilis 'Persian Pearl'. Species tulips are small tulips that are happy in rock gardens and aren't hybrids...they will return again and again if happy. Here is a quote from wikipedia! Species Tulips are different from the hybridized garden tulips, seen in gardens world wide, in that they are less widely grown—and known—than the garden hybrids, and are unlikely to ever outsell or even approach their level of popularity. However, more and more species are becoming available each year.

    Species tulips are frequently listed under the heading ‘botanical tulips’, which makes them sound dull or specialized, and probably difficult to grow. Tulip species are not difficult to grow and they are certainly not dull.

    You do not have to buy species tulips new every year to guarantee flowers. Plant the bulbs in the right place and they will re-bloom year after year with colorful flowers, and, in time, may even increase by themselves to form sizeable colonies.

    Tulip species are the starting point in the long story of the garden tulip and they are still out there, growing in the wild—in Europe, North Africa, and Asia. They are usually smaller and less bold than the garden hybrids, and extra care may be needed to grow some of them successfully, but they amaze with the intensity of their color and surprise with the size of their flowers. Growing in distant mountain ranges, hidden gorges, and remote meadows are plants that wouldn’t look out of place in the brightest, most flamboyant garden.

    Gail

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  18. I'm so happy for you that you got your camera back. It takes excellent photos. I see your Thalictrum/Anemonella thalictroides is blooming. Mine have sprouted & it won't be long. I'm looking forward to photos of your Trilliums when they bloom.

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  19. Dear Gail,

    I missed your camera, and your blog! It left a hole in my day to not see any new entries or pictures from you!

    Where do I fit Gail? Old, old friend, blogger, but not much more than a vicarious gardener these past few years...

    And I think you would be surprised at the number of people that ARE reading your blog, but never comment; I am often surprised to find out people read mine. Sometimes I think I am writing to myself (which is okay with me in a way I am!) and then someone will say something about something I wrote...funny!

    xxoo Lynn

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  20. Great to see you have your camera back! i loved your cedar glade entry, i do an entire blog on the cedar glades here in Nashville take a look sometime and let me know what you think! nashvillecedarglade.blogspot

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  21. Hi Gail, so pleased that you got your camera back....and you are so right......
    There is much beauty in each and every photograph that you have uploaded.....including the crocus saying goodbye til next year......

    I do not have any friends who garden, so blogging for me has opened up a whole new world. I love to read about others joys and disappointments and learn from their posts......

    Your garden is one of my pleasures....so glad you are up and running again.....

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  22. Great photoessay celebration of the return of your camera - I thoroughly enjoyed it. I love photos of things such as the faded crocus, and the Rusty Blackhaw is new and arresting to me.

    Sherry,the answer to your question is a little convoluted. Species tulips are, officially, wild tulips, and there are many different species from different parts of the world, as well as local variations on species. Species tulips can have colorations from cream to deep red, and water requirements from moist to dry and rocky.

    Breeders have also gotten ahold of these wild tulips - including breeders from hundreds of years ago in the Middle East - and these variations on the original wild tulips are also called "species" or "species type" tulips. They all tend to be much more reliable at coming back year after year than the big lush garden types.

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  23. Hi Gail, your happiness nearly lept off the screen this evening. Yipeeeeeeeeee Great to see that you have your camera back. The photos are so good. I am thrilled to see each and every one. Especially the spider, bird bait. It just shows how warm it is. It won't be long and it will be like that here.

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  24. Gail, I'm so glad to have met you - and to have actually met you! What a tremendous community this is... Now what the heck is a Rusty Blackhaw?! That was a gorgeous pic and I think I need one.

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  25. I feel the same way. Hard to explain to others the fascination with each new addition. Marveling at nature, art no one can duplicate.
    Brenda

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  26. Yay! Glad you got your camera back before blooming season really took off. :) I love the picture of the spider on the flower I have several like that too. Seeing nature in miniature is so amazing to me.

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  27. so glad you have your camera back. I know exactly what you mean about the garden blogging community... isn't it nice to have so many people who like to ooh and ahh over the same things we're always oohing and ahhing over.
    irena

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  28. What lovely photos Gail! I do believe your garden is ahead of us here, so it's extra wonderful to see these flowers.

    I *love* Rue Anemone. It's so exquisite.

    I like the Single-Flower Kerria too. I'm not crazy about the double, but the Single Flower is beautiful in part shade. I've seen it at Niche.

    I know you're glad to have your camera back, as are we all! Love your pictures!

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  29. Gail, I'm so glad your camera is well again. The pics are gorgeous as always.
    The one with the spider made me shudder. I was bitten on the cheek by a spider. The dr. thought it may be a brown recluse. I don't know what kind it was but the bite left a "hole" of sorts in my cheek. So I have to look at it when I look at myself in the mirror. Had some trouble with it for awhile afterward s. Not nice to have a hole in your face. I was bit while I was asleep.
    Just be careful.

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  30. Kris, Viburnum rufidulum...Rusty Blackhaw...It is a beauty and the fall color is magnificent...after it flowers the blue/black berries are stellar!

    I am very glad to have met you, too! I will see you this summer when I visit the son and see Layanee.

    Gail

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  31. I'm so glad you have your good camera back, because I certainly enjoy your photos. What beautiful flowers you already have blooming!

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  32. Lola, I am sorry to hear that...I have heard that brown recluse bites cause the problem you describe...I will be careful, thanks for the warning...Are you continuing to heal? gail

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  33. Yay for your camera being returned! Yes we do understand the wonder and excitement at each little bud, leaf & flower that starts to emerge and bloom. Thanks for sharing your blooms with us today Gail. Beautiful!

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  34. Gail, I know exactly what you mean about being able to share our blooms. Even the first hint of a green shoot sends ups running for our camera to share a picteure with our gardening buddies doesn't it?

    I love the PJM and the Georgia Blue as well as the Iberis. Oh what the heck-I love all your blooms! So glad you have your camera back and thought to celebrate by sharing with us.

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  35. Congrats on the return of your camera. I can't get along without my blogging friends or my camera, and you're right--no one else quite understands. Hope you got a lot of good gardening done today.

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  36. Ok, I have to admit that I cried reading this. And yes! I do understand the beauty of life through a lens. I am so glad you can document the beauty again. Big hugs to ya. All the bloomers in your post seem to know you appreciate them.

    Your blog is so easy to read. Thank you. I'm still working on big print for my site. I need wordpress to lend me a hand.

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  37. Hi Gail,
    You have a great assortment of lovelies blooming right now ... and yippee on you getting your camera back!

    Cool to see that we both have the same Species Tulip, 'Persian Pearl' ... ours are up and coming right along, about 3" high already and we just discovered them last weekend! I was excited to see your Trilliums are up too ... no sign of ours yet, but they're very reliable and hope they multiply again this year because we're getting a nice collection going! Is your one of the white ones? I'd love to get one of the Wake Robin red ones, but they're very expensive and rather hard to find, sigh.

    I love spent Crocus too! Heck, crocus in any form are great!

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  38. Lovely blog and beautiful pics, glad to knw that you got your camera back .

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  39. Hi Gail .. here I am in the back of the classroom again ! LOL
    Love all the pretty flowers and Mr. Robin : )
    The shed is gone (our contractor had 6 guys come and literally pick the whole thing up , heavy wooden base included) and carry it to the front driveway and put it on a trailer .. so it is being used by one of the guys and not going to the recycle plant .. the old gal is still very useful after all ! haha .. I'm talking about the shed !!

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  40. Your camera is definitely BACK!! and has lots to focus on. Lovely, lovely blooming beauties in your garden Gail. I would take it one step further and say non gardeners don't appreciate all these things either (let alone the blogging world). I'm glad I belong to both worlds!!

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  41. Ohhhhhhhh, are those for me? You shouldn't have but I'm sure glad you did bother to get them for me. ;-)

    Glad to see your camera restored to you Gail, what should we garden bloggers do without one?

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  42. Cool! Somehow, with you camera back, your photos look more lively or is it my imagination? You're such a sweet blogger to share such beauties for us all. What a great way to celebrate the reunion! Cheers.

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  43. I would be lost without my camera! I could live without a lot of things but my camera, no way as I want the beauty around me to stay with me for many years to come and a camera can do just that. When i am old and can no longer garden, I can still look at my pretties in the pictures!

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  44. What better way to celebrate getting your camera back than getting out in the garden and finding all the beautiful surprises from nature. I especially love the picture of the Tulips with the Rosemary and Kerria in the background.

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  45. So happy you got your camera back. It's great to be able to record the passing beauty in a garden.
    That Japanese rose is so pretty!

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  46. Gail, Your photos are fabulous - and you sound as happy as can be. And as far as people not commenting, I've had folks who I barely know me (and who never comment) come up to me in a grocery store or hort club, just continue a stream of thought I'd started on line - very twilight zonish. My mum called once and left a message saying, "good job I read your blog, otherwise I would have never known you were sick the other day." So glad your camera is back in your hands where it belongs.

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  47. Loosing your camera is like loosing your glasses, glad your back at recording the beauty!

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  48. What beauties you have growing at your home! I'm so glad your camera is back. I cannot imagine a day without mine...yes we fellow bloggers certainly do understand your excitement!!! Kim

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  49. Hi Gail!! I know you know how much fun I've been having this week!! Having the first show of Spring and anticipating more!! However, the weather forecast for tonight is 4" of snow!! Do you know what I did? I took a whole tarpload of leaves and re-distributed them onto my daffodils and tulips, etc!! (Oh! I'd better run outdoors. There were daffs ready to bloom and I need to cut and bring them indoors!) Hey- by the way - none of my non-blogging gardener friends leave comments, either. Oh, well. :-)

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  50. glad to see you and your camera are back together again. wonderful photos of what is blooming at your lovely place. thank God for this beautiful time of the year.

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  51. You're obviously in a much better place now! So many different things blooming for you now, wow. And so many of them I haven't seen before. Good luck with the next round of storms!

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  52. Gail, that is so true! Not too many people that I know care about those things that are so important to me. I'm so thankful to share that part of my life with those who read my blog and I enjoy sharing that part of their life with them too. Thank you for being a part of that!

    I'm glad you got your camera back! Beautiful blooms!

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  53. Such good news to see the return of your camera, Gail. And yes, no one understands a gardener quite the way another gardener--or several hundred--do.

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  54. Oh. My. God. Gail, you have just answered a question I have been trying to resolve for a couple of years now! The Kerria, Japanese Rose...that's what I have, 4 bushes of them!! I planted them and didn't even pay attention to what they were. For several years now, they bloom in the spring, lasting for quite a while! They are GORGEOUS. And I have been calling it 'bush cinquefoil' (and for all I know, it still might be the correct botanical name:-)--but, definitely is the Japanese Rose you called it. That is it...I can't wait to correct that on my blog!! I looked all over, trying to match it's photo online but could never quite get it. What did it for me were your photos of the leaves. I couldn't find those leaves on any of the online sites I went to. WHY didn't I just photograph it and post it and ASK for help?? I have no idea;-( Maybe now I'll know that I really need to take advantage of your knowledge, and other garden bloggers, and just ask!
    By the way, glad you have your camera. I'd practically die without mine:-)

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  55. Hi Gail,
    I enjoyed your post and the awesome photos. I noticed the spider before you pointed it out, too. Blogging is fun, and causes you to notice things in your surroundings you may not have if you weren't blogging.

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  56. I tried to leave a comment on your new post about planting grass, and just a blank space showed up, as it did on another one I tried. I love your yard, and none of it looks neglected to me! I enlarged several of the photos. You really can see a lot more when you do that. I'm excited to see pics of the area throughout the season.

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  57. Hooray for getting your camera back! I do so love looking at your photos.

    Melanie

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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