Home of the Practically Perfect Pink Phlox and other native plants for pollinators

Thursday, November 13, 2008

On Behalf Of Our Friends, The Bees~~~



.....A Public service Announcement!

I suspect many of you have already begun to plan your garden. You know what worked and you have a good idea about plants you want to try. My list is long...filled with plants that haven't a snow balls chance in Hades to survive here! But they were so attractive in your gardens and I sure wish they would grow in mine! The seed and plant catalogs are stacked on my desk! A tower of print material that is must reading! It is exciting to think about next year!

Which is why right now is an an excellent time for all of us to remember the bees and plant for them!

VP (Veg Plotting) and The Patient Gardener have recently reminded me of the fragility of our bees. VP posted earlier that England is running out of English honey and following that Patient Gardener posted about Colony Collapse Disorder with a link to an English Petition site.

I must confess, it is has been easy for me to see lots of bees in the garden and think that they are no longer in jeopardy from virus, mites, pesticide poisoning, malnourishment, stress or what ever it is, that is causing Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). Too little is known about the causes of declines in bee populations. But it is clear~~~

Bees are still in danger.

So the question is ~~~What can we gardeners do?
The answer~~More than we might think!

It is simple.

We must plan and plant for the bees!

Specifically native bees! With over 4000 different native bees in the US and more than 254 species in Brittain...there are certainly some visiting our gardens! They may even live there...we just haven't seen their nests. Unlike honey bees, most native bees are solitary insects. More than half of them nest in the ground, about a foot beneath the soil. Some of them are as small as ants; so small we hardly notice them.

So we can provide a place for them to nest! They will nest in snags in trees, dead branches and in hedgerows. So leave some trees and rotted wood about! They nest in soft ground, so we need to leave a few bare patches of ground. They love soft wood...I have several old benches they have moved into! Perfect little tunnels! We can even provide commercial mason bee houses or make our own. Some bees need clay to build their homes...so provide a shovel full of powdered clay unless you garden on clay, as many of us do...then there is plenty! Finally, just provide water someplace in your garden.


Plant native plants that provide nectar and pollen for bees. Why natives? Researches believe that native plants are better at attracting native bees, because they evolved together. But, my dear gardening friends, we don't have to give up exotics, since many also provide nectar or pollen for garden visitors! Lavender, rosemary, calendula and cosmos, are excellent bee attractors. This is of course, just the short list of bee attractive plants!

You may already have a number of bee attractive native or exotic plants in your garden....Here are a few more suggestions! Remember, your part of the world probably has bee attracting natives that I haven't listed. (edit)

Trees and shrubs for bees:
Cercis
Malus
Ribes
Rosa...especially rugosa
Salix.
Prunus
Viburnums
Dogwoods
Ceonanthus...CA lilac

Flowers for bees:
Geranium (hardy)
Penstemon
Dandelion
Nemophilia
Trifolium repens (clover)
Sunflowers
Liatris
Coneflowers
Asters
Goldenrods
Cosmos (single not double)
Zinnias (single not double)
Bergamots (Beebalms)
Salvias
Agastache
Oregano
Columbines
Nightshade Family
Veronias
Joe Pye Weed
Verbenas...native and bonariensis

Diverse sources of nectar and pollen are critical. So no monocultures! Research has shown that when we plant more than 10 different, bee attractive plants in our gardens...we will attract the most bees! Finally, it is important that we plant flowers that bloom successively over the entire growing season in order to provide pollen and nectar resources all the time. Some bees are seasonal, so our garden flowers must provide for the native bees of all seasons. If there isn't enough nectar the bees stop laying eggs!

In case you still need some convincing!
Did you know that native bees are the home gardeners most valuable pollinators? They are ten times more effficent then honeybees! They fly faster and can visit more plants in a shorter period of time. They even do a better job of cross pollinating. Although, with 20,000 plus honeybees in each hive...honeybees are excellent at pollinating fields of crops! You and I can't provide enough nectar and pollen for most honeybee hives! Farmers can. But, with the decline in honey bee populations, farmers are beginning to encourage native bees by planting rows of bee attractive plants between their crops! Smart farmers are also restricting the use of pesticides.

Which brings us to the last factor of the plan to help native bees~~

We must stop or restrict pesticide use in the garden."Avoid pesticides, wherever possible. Bees need only a tiny amount to be affected. If you get pesticides on the flowers, bees may take pesticide-laden pollen back to the nest and kill the eggs. If you must spray, do so in the evening or on overcast days, when bees aren’t around. Pay careful attention to usage instructions." ( Xerces Society)


My dear gardening friends, I don't presume to know nearly enough about the bee's plight...I've raised some issues, shared some ideas on helping bring native bees to our gardens and include the following informational links in case you wish to learn more.

The Xerces Society, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the conservation of invertebrates, has launched a nationwide effort to piece together the current and former distribution of many species of bees. In other words...all bees seem to be affected not just honey bees!

Some places you can go to learn about CCD...including a petition urging action on this incredibly serious issue.

National Resources Defense Council: The Bees' Needs


If you know of other resources, please let me know and I will post them!

Izyjo dropped this link to the Great SunFlower Project.

Creating Our Eden has a good bee post, too.
Cheryl at My Wildlife Sanctuary has excellent bee posts.
Shirl's Bee contribution from England
From Brenda info on habitat building. 

Vertie suggested this link  about native bees

Not to forget our European readers...if you have other links that you think might be helpful, please let me know!

Thanks to all of you who have posted about CCD or the decline in bees, especially those bloggers whose posts I have not come across or may have forgotten. If you would like me to post a link, just let me know.

Thank you for stopping by and, do have a wonderful day.

Gail

“Even cheese needs bees. Alfalfa seed is pollinated by bees, and that seed grows to hay, which is bought by farmers for cows that produce milk for cheese.” Mike Vaughan, a commercial beekeeper in Ojai for more than 25 years.

85 comments:

  1. What a bunch of good information. I am glad I have planted enough varieties to attract some bees. They are busy....:)

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  2. A good post Gail. It is great to walk out in the garden and see all of those bees buzzing around. It is amazing to see the diversity of bees in the garden too. There is every shape and size. I am always trying to figure out what kind are in my garden. They really make the garden come alive.

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  3. Thank you so much for the information, bees are so important. I am pleased to say that I saw more this year than last year, so, I must be doing something right.

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  4. Tina,

    I am glad you think so...the bees are terribly important and so easy to plant for! They willbe very happy in your garden...I know because you have a wide variety of plants they love!

    Gail

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  5. Lis,

    Reading about bees made me realize that some of the little unidentifiable flying creatures were tiny little bees! So exciting! They do make a garden feel alive, you've said it so well!

    Gail

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  6. Darla,

    Isn't that the best feeling! I suspect you are doing a lot right to see so many more bees.

    Gail

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  7. Hi Gail, What a lovely post. I hope to join the http://www.greatsunflower.org next year. I can't remember which blog I saw it on, but the basic idea is you plant free sunflower seeds from the Project and then several weekends during the Summer you go out and count how long it is before five bees land on the flower you are watching. When I had a vegetable garden in Nashville proper there were no honey bees, no bumble bees, no bees. Luckily, the bee population out here seems to be doing okay. I've read so many different hypothesis on the subject, it truly a frightening phenomenon.

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  8. IZYjo,

    I have seen that project and I will add the link to the post...thank you! I am glad you have bees in your new location! I am in an old suburb with many trees and lots of native plants...they have found me and I am so happy to welcome them to the garden!

    Gail

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  9. Gail, excellent post!!! I loved your photos. One of the worst things gardeners are using in their gardens are the systemic insecticides. These are used on lawns for grub worms, on trees for bores and in flower gardens for everything from aphids to Japanese beetles. Use of these poisons the lawn clovers, tree blossoms and garden flowers--all essential to bees AND predatory wasps that kill the bad insects.
    Marnie

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  10. Hi Gail, thanks for letting us know more about our friends the buzzers. I didn't know the tiny guys are bees too! We still have some on the few flowers left. I am especially noticing how they love the native white asters that wer formerly thought of as weeds here, well they are a bit weedy. I will leave more of them and continue the no pesticide regimen we follow. A new discovery...dryer lint stops snails and slugs! Make a circle around the plant and replenish as necessary. An endless supply too.

    Frances

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  11. Gail,

    This is a fantastic and informative post!

    We have THREE feral (wild) hives near us. There are actually two on my neighbor's land, but I count that as one. A friend of ours is a beekeeper (we buy honey from him) and is working on an article for my blog.

    Thanks for supporting the bees!
    Cameron

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  12. A fabulous post Gail......full of info that will help the bees......
    I have worked for seven years here to make my garden bee and butterfly friendly.....it is working so far......I had a lot of bees in my garden this summer, including the honey bee......

    Another plant some might be interested in is Verbena Bonariensis......this for me was the bee and butterfly plant of the summer.......

    Tku so much for highlighting the plight of our bees.....something very close to my heart.......

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  13. What an excellent list, Gail! And we mustn't forget that those of us who don't currently have a large garden can do what we can to make sure that "Nature's Garden" that surrounds us is kept as healthy and attractive to bees as possible.

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  14. Nancy,

    Good point Nancy! We have local groups folks can join...and we can always contact our local gov't reps!

    Gail

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  15. Frances,

    They do love those native asters...btw, do you need any seed puffs from the purple lilac native asters? I can send you a bunch! They would look sweet along the fences! I love the way they arch over and get weighed down by the bumbles! I don't have slugs or snails! It's all the dry clay, but this might work this winter when we get all our rain and it is warmer again. I usually throw the link in the compost!

    Gail

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  16. Cameron,

    Wow, three feral hives...I would love to see them. Btw, I am glad you liked the post...bees are the best friends our gardens have, besides us!

    gail

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  17. Cheryl,

    That is a great plant...I will add it to the post. I knew you would like this post; well, I was hoping you would! have you posted on this subject before and if so may I post a link to the post?

    Gail

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  18. Marnie,

    The whole lawn industry really gets to me! A $52 billion industry to grow a perfectly green monoculture...no clover, no sweet little bugs in the grasses! The run off of pesticides and fertilizers into our water systems! I think we are on the same page!
    I am really glad you enjoyed the post!

    Gail

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  19. Fabulous reminder Gail. On my list of things to plant are fall blooming plants (native asters, salvias, etc.) that you so beautifully featured on your blog. I think that's been the season least covered in my garden and I plan to remedy that next year. I think it's critical to support the bees also so I whole heartedly concur with your message. I was noticing this summer which plants don't attract bees AT ALL (like cannas, mandevillas, etc. ~ a lot of tropicals that I work so hard to keep) and I decided then & there not to add anymore of those to my garden (than I already have). I plan to be a more "bee/pollinator friendly" gardener in the future. Great post as usual for you!

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  20. Thanks for the info.
    We have plenty of bees!!
    My DH grows about 100 heirloom tomato plants every year which they love. Of course we get some cross pollination...but that's nature.
    Also grow tons of annuals every year myself.I think we have a happy backyard.
    Thanks again. Have a great day.
    Patsi

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  21. A little bee landed on my shoe while I was out working in the garden yesterday and I also spotted a long tail skipper on the butterfly bush so they are still around here...

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  22. I don't know where they hang out but we have all kind of bees from not much bigger that a gnat to carpenter bee size. It is easy to get stung by the tiny ones before you realize they are bees.
    Donna

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  23. We are bee friendly folks around our garden. We enjoy them too much!-Randy

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  24. Hi Gail - what a great, informative post! Thanks for the link love too :)

    Luckily I've had a lot of bees in my garden this year, in spite of the awful summer we had. Lots of lavender, Echinacea and Erysimum seem to do the trick for me.

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  25. An important reminder! Thanks for this list - I will be saving it and will take it with me when I buy plants this spring. I have lots of liatrus and they seem to love it. The flowers on the bean vines were also a big hit.

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  26. Great post! I grow a lot of those attractors (rosemary, bee balm, lavender, asters, coneflower, etc) but one other I'd like to nominate in the shrub category is ceanothus, or California lilac. You don't have to live in California to grow it! There are varieties that can take down to Zone 4 and up to 10, and the bees go nuts for it!

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  27. kathleen,

    There are a few plants that I have noticed in various gardens that never have visitors...we know they have some kind of pollinator (maybe the wind) but the tropicals don't have them up here!

    Thank you so much for your kind words..we love your containers and hope to see the usual tropical beauties next year, along with the natives that shine in fall.

    Gail

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  28. The bees are so important and your post does a perfect job at highlighting it. I will be visiting those links to learn more!

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  29. Karen,

    Hi and thank you...I added Ceananthus to the list...I have long admired the beauty of that shrub! But I always thought it was strictly CA.

    Gail

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  30. patsi,

    Now that is a rousing endorsement of plantings...a happy backyard! I want that, too! So glad you stopped by to see the bees...thanks for sharing your garden with us!

    Gail

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  31. jgh,

    I am glad you popped over and left me a note. Good luck with your raised bed adventure! Did your liatris look gorgeous this fall? Mine has colored up beautifully.

    gail

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  32. Hi Gail
    Thanks for the link to my blog. I'm glad you found my post about bees informative. I too try and plant with bees in mind and have lots of bees in my garden. Favourites are Lavender and Grevillia.

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  33. skeeter,

    We might actually have flowers for bloom day! Not many but a few! How fantastic to still see bees and skippers! I love knowing that the bees might be nesting in the garden.

    gail

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  34. One thing you can do is leave some dandelions blooming early in the spring - they tend to bloom before anything else, and they are excellent nectar flowers for bees who are out exploring when not a lot has started blooming.

    Great post, Gail! We all need to be more mindful of the bees and things we can do to help them.

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  35. Kim,

    Hi...I knew you would have more sage advice! I know that bees ned those early blooming 'weeds' first thing when they emerge from the nests...NO monocultures!

    Thanks, Kim!

    Gail

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  36. Patient Gardener,

    Thank you fro reminding me that the bees were still needing our attention! I don't know that plant you mentioned...Grevillia...
    Again, thank you!

    gail

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  37. cindy,

    You are a doll! I know you will visit them and will use what you learn. Lillian is so lucky to have a mom who cares and will her teach her to be a good earth caretaker!

    Gail

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  38. Dear Gail.....During the spring and summer months I did numerous posts on bees.......they are apassion of mine, particularly the bumble bee.....I also keep and overwinter mason bees.....it was a very bad year in the UK for them...although I did get some beautiful photographs of some rare species.......please do feel free to link to any of my posts....and any time.....anything that helps bees worldwide is something I truly care about.......When my bee season starts next year I shall be recommending your blog to anyone I think may be interested in reading your views on the bees.....the more people who help them the better.........

    It has been such a pleasure to read your posts on them and to meet someone who is like minded.....I am grateful to Rose for introducing us.....

    Best wishes.......

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  39. vp.

    Loved giving you a link...you and Patient gardener reminded me of the bees plight! I thank you for that!
    There are plants that are major bee attractors and it sounds like they came to your garden...rain or shine!

    gail

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  40. Jamie and Randy,

    I wanted to thank you fro reminding me about your post...I have linked to it!

    gail

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  41. cherye,
    Thanks...I will check out a few posts to make a link! You are so right it will take a world wide effort to get politicians off their duffs and working for the bees sake! The world wide effort is your thought...the off their duffs is mine!

    Gail

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  42. donna,

    The little ones are a big surprise! So many of them!
    I imagine your garden is a bee magnet.

    Gail

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  43. All we are saying, is give bees a chance. (Sorry, I couldn't resist!) My most popular late summer early autumn plant for bees is Sedum. One afternoon I saw 4 different kinds of bees jockeying for position on my Sedum/Hylotelephium 'Black Jack.' Here's a creepy little tidbit: my daughter came home from school yesterday & informed me that they used tiny dead bees to pollinate their Wisconsin Fast Plants in science class. It's great the kids are learning about bees, but eeewww.

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  44. Very informational post today Gail. I have most of these plants in my garden now, but I have been adding more natives each year. Hopefully if we as gardeners all do our part it will make a difference for the bees.

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  45. Wow Gail - what a wonderful wealth of information and links :-D

    I applaud you! Last year for Blog Action Day I made a very brief posting with a link for the Bumblebee Conservation Trust here in the UK see http://www.bumblebeeconservationtrust.co.uk/index.htm

    Awareness is the key and you have certainly done them proud :-D

    BTW I've a new hedgehog 'story' for you :-D

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  46. My goodness Gail! What a lot of valuable info and wonderful liknks you have provided us with. Cheryl, has made a bee lover of me already, but I am so glad others are learning of the bee's plight and are trying to help. Your pictures are wonderful and you could frame each one of them. Thanks again for all the great planting ideas. Maybe next spring we should do a bee posting like Dave did with te fall colors. A progression of bees across the countries.

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  47. Gail, this is a fantastic post! I have learned so much about the bees this year from reading Cheryl's blog (My Wildlife Sanctuary), but you have added even more information specific to the U.S. Sometime earlier this summer I ran across a blog by a beekeeper who lives not far from me. I will have to try to find it again and add it to your resources if he is still updating his blog. That's where I first learned about Colony Collapse Disorder.

    This really is a timely post, too, as we start to dream of next year's plantings. I, too, have such a long plant wish list that I may have to plow up the "back forty" to plant everything:) It's good to see that I do have many of the plants you've listed here, but I will make a note of the others as I add new ones to my garden.

    Thanks for your comment on my last post, Gail. I wanted to tell you that some time ago I was going through some of your old posts--maybe to find the blackberry lilies--and ran across a post you did on the Bur Oak. I tried to find it again the other day to avoid copying anything you had, but I didn't have any luck. Hope I didn't plagiarize again:)

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  48. Thank you for this most valuable of information! I refuse to use insecticide in my gardens. I garden on the east side of my garden home, and have no lawn there at all. I just planted a potted pincushion flower and bees seem to love it. Also have people go to the National Wildlife Federation. http://www.nwf.org for information on habitats for bees and such. Thanks again! I shall heed your advice while planting!
    Brenda

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  49. Thanks for all of the information, I love planting for bees too. I have been planting all native plants this last year in my garden and plan to continue from now on. They are so much easier to take care of too.

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  50. The bees are happily fed and safe at my house. I don't use pesticides anymore. I see a lot of native bees, but I've been worried about the honeybees as I haven't seen many this year. Great info my friend.~~Dee

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  51. great post, we need our bees! we all need to do the more natural approach to gardening. it just makes sense. thanks gail for the info.

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  52. Gail, You have given us MUCH to think about and MUCH to link back to for even more information. I have only heard bits and pieces of all you mentioned but it is all so interesting. I really think using pesticides (or not) has so much to do with the bees hanging around our gardens. I've noticed a huge increase here since I stopped using them all together several years ago. We seem to have so many different varieties here and I certainly have no idea the names of them. They are an integral part of how the entire ecosystem must work together. We can all do our part no matter how small.
    Great post... thank you.
    Meems

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  53. dee,

    The honeybees worry me, too! But I am glad you are taking care of the native bees! The no pesticide is so very helpful. Thanks for stopping by my friend!

    Gail

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  54. meems,

    Isn't it a good feeling to watch the flying creatures and know that you are helping them help us! What I do know is that you have created a wonderful ecosystem in your garden; the butterflies and bees must be incredibly happy there! Thank you Meems for sharing that with us!

    Gail

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  55. Hey Marmee,

    Now if only we can convince the folks who still want to kill every bug they see! Then we work on the folks who run our community gov't! I am glad you popped over!

    Gail

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  56. lythrum,

    How exciting to have planted lots of natives! I bet you have a lot of garden visitors! Thank you for stopping by and sharing your garden story!

    Gail

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  57. Hey Brenda,

    Thanks for another good link...I will add it to the others! There really is very good information out there. There are even garden plans and directions on spacing plants at one site I visited! Thank you for sharing the info and telling us about your garden.

    Gail

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  58. rose,

    I hope you plow back the lower 40 and have at the big native plant garden! It would be beautiful. Did you happen to catch that zinnias are bee magnets! Isn't that great! Cosmos, too. Boy are we lucky! I loved your Bur oak post! There are so many ideas floating around the internet...who knows where they all originate!

    Gail

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  59. mmd,

    I was quite surprised myself that sedum is so popular with the bees. The honeybees really favored Autumn Joy. I didn't notice any on the Matrona I added in August when Frances gave it to me. But the Heuchera Autumn Bride was the big draw in that flower bed. Fascinating about the dead bee pollination experiment!

    Gail

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  60. Beckie,

    I bet Cheryl would love to organize the Bee Meme! Thank you for introducing her posts to me...she and Iseem to have a similar style and both love the bees!

    Have a great day tomorrow!

    Gail

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  61. Perennial Gardener,

    Hi...I can tell that your garden is filled with plants that bring in the bees! Aren't we lucky to enjoy nature and then get to surround ourselves with it!

    Gail

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  62. A mindful post and beautiful photos, Gail. The long winter provides ample opportunity to plan. As a gardener for over 30 years, I beckon them ... thankfully (for both plants and my camera) my garden has been blessed.

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  63. Hi Gail,
    I have to weigh in with Marnie about monocultures and the lack of clovers and other native plants. Though I'm a bit aggressive with clover in the formal beds, in the yard, I'm delighted to have it, precisely for the bees!

    You have a great post here on their importance in the garden (remember my fretting about our population in June when we had the flooding?). And your list of links I must visit when I get more time ... Always happy to see another garden blogger extoll the virtues of the bees. Too many silly people give them a bad rap!!

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  64. Wonderful post and so important, thank you so very much / Tyra

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  65. Good morning Gail, what an outstanding post! You've provided tons of excellent information and resources.

    It's gratifying in many ways planting more blooming plants, especially natives. The bees and other wildlife we attract and feed benefit the environment and our souls.

    Looks like we were visiting each other at the same time this morning! :~)

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  66. Great information Gail! I avoid pesticides to help the bees and I let the clover grow in the yard rather than try to eradicate it. I was looking at your tree list and I think I have almost everyone in my yard, I guess I did good!

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  67. Dave,

    Hi! You done good Dave! Forgive that horrendous grammar, I just couldn't resist! Your garden must be happy with bees! The girls must love to watch them.

    Gail

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  68. Gardengirl,

    Speaking of a gratifying and soulful feeling...Let's talk about your new vegie garden! The bees will be even more important in your garden! All the native plants are going to bring in the bees and you will have a bumper crop of tomatoes and other vegies! Very exciting isn't it!

    Gail

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  69. Hi my Northern friend Tyra. Thank you! I need to research the bees from your part of the world, too? Any suggestions or sites to link to?

    Gail

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  70. IVG,

    I remember you were very concerned. Down pours also wash away the pollen....but with successive bloom, there will be more pollen for our friends. Since having read that over %60 are ground nesters ...flooding bother me too!

    I do believe that we re on the same page regarding monocultures. Happy reading when you get the time!

    So glad you stopped by! Give Pepe a pat for me!

    Gail

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  71. Joey,

    You have written a lovely comment, thank you! It will be a good winter of planning and dreaming for many of us!

    Gail

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  72. We haven't had a frost yet, so there are plenty of flowers to please the bees here, Gail. Our climate is different so hope you don't mind a very local list!

    Bees are now on native plants like different species of Salvia, Scutellaris/Skullcap, Gaura and Conoclinium/mistflower as well as on the native shrub Leucophyllum frutescens/Cenizo. Bees large, medium & tiny are also enjoying flowers of Cupheas, roses, zinnias, alyssum, bulbine,herbs like lavender, rosemary, basil, Mexican oregano and Mexican mint Marigold, the remaining pepper plants, and shrubs and trees like Meyer's Lemon, Abelia, Sweet Olive and Loquat which are in bloom now.

    MMD's comment, "All we are saying, is give bees a chance." was pretty cool.

    Annie at the Transplantable Rose

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  73. Annie,

    It really was cool; I am glad you mentioned it. Your list is very comprehensive. What is native and a bee magnet in my part of the world is surely not gonna always cut it in yours! I will make a note in the posting! Thanks and more thanks!

    Gail

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  74. Excellent post I agree 100 percent. What is good for bees and butterflies is good for my garden

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  75. You put a lot of work into this, thank you for all the information. I really like the first photo.

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  76. Rusty,

    Absolutely! You have a good garden!

    Gail

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  77. Les,

    It was a fun post to write...I really do think there are important steps that we as gardeners can do...even if it is only to plant a few plants.

    I liked that photo too! Thanks!

    Gail

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  78. Gail - thanks for the great, informative and responsible post. Knowing of the plight of the bees, I was very pleased to note later this summer that many of the bees had returned to my garden and were happily pollinating from plant to plant. Almost all of my plants are bee/butterfly and bird friendly -- and beautiful to boot!

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  79. Great information on bees, Gail. (I couldn't get the USDA links to work, for some reason.) Here's a link discussing the native bees and the professional colonies. In my entomology class, I learned that the working colonies are most affected by CCD: http://baynature.org/articles/oct-dec-2007/are-native-bees-suffering-the-same-colony-collapse-disorder-as-honeybees.

    As always though, the efforts we make it our yards will also help save the bees.

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  80. Vertie,

    Thanks for the link info, I posted it and also I will check out the malfunctioning gov't links. Ironic isn't it that the gov't links would malfunction!

    Take care! As always a pleasure...

    Gail

    ReplyDelete
  81. Diana,

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    Gail

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Let us be grateful to people who make us happy;
they are the charming gardeners
who make our souls blossom.


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